CFR is proud to act as the collaborative applicant for the Marietta/Cobb Continuum of Care. With local nonprofits working together, we can move toward a realistic vision of ending homelessness in our area.

GA-506 MARIETTA/COBB CONTINUUM OF CARE

The Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act of 2009 (HEARTH Act), enacted into law on May 20, 2009, consolidates three of the separate homeless assistance programs administered by HUD under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act into a single grant program, and revises the Emergency Shelter Grants program and renames it the Emergency Solutions Grants program. The HEARTH Act also codifies in law the Continuum of Care planning process, a longstanding part of HUD’s application process to assist homeless persons by providing greater coordination in responding to their needs.

The purpose of the Continuum of Care (CoC) program is to promote communitywide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness; provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers, and State and local governments to quickly rehouse homeless individuals and families while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused to homeless individuals, families, and communities by homelessness; promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by homeless individuals and families; and optimize self-sufficiency among individuals and families experiencing homelessness. Local continuums of care, which are geographically based groups of representatives that carry out the planning responsibilities of the Continuum of Care program, as set out in the HEARTH regulations. These representatives come from organizations that provide services to the homeless, or represent the interests of the homeless or formerly homeless. A Continuum of Care then designates certain ‘‘applicants’’ as the entities responsible for carrying out the projects that the Continuum has identified through its planning responsibilities.

The CoC program includes transitional housing, permanent supportive housing for disabled persons, permanent housing, supportive services, and Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS).

A Continuum of Care also designates one particular applicant to be a ‘‘collaborative applicant.’’ The collaborative applicant is the only entity that can apply for a grant from HUD on behalf of the Continuum that the collaborative applicant represents. The GA-506 Marietta/Cobb Continuum of Care serves homeless individuals and families throughout Cobb County and its municipalities. The Collaborative Applicant appointed by the CoC Board is The Center for Family Resources.

PUBLIC NOTICE: 2017 COMPETITION

GA-506 Marietta/Cobb Continuum of Care

 

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

 

Each year the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides federal resources for homeless services through its Continuum of Care (CoC) Program.   The CoC Program (24 CFR part 578) is designed to promote a community-wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness; to provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers, States, and local governments to quickly re-house homeless individuals, families, persons fleeing domestic violence, and youth while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused by homelessness; to promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by the homeless; and to optimize self-sufficiency among those experiencing homelessness. CoC funds may be used for projects under five program components:  Permanent Housing (including rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing); Transitional Housing; Supportive Services Only; and HMIS.

Application for funding is made through the Continuum which completes an annual application on behalf of all the projects in the community.  The Center for Family Resources serves as the Collaborative Applicant for the GA-506 Marietta/Cobb CoC and prepares the consolidated application. HUD requires project applications submitted to the CoC for inclusion as part of the CoC Consolidated Application must be reviewed and either accepted and ranked or rejected by the CoC.

During the 2017 competition, new projects may only be created through reallocation of existing projects or through the permanent housing bonus. The CoC has not determined at this time if any projects will be reallocated in whole or part.  New projects may be created through the permanent housing bonus for projects that meet the requirements of Dedicated PLUS as defined in Section III.A.3.d. of the NOFA or new permanent supportive housing projects where 100 percent of the beds are dedicated to chronic homelessness; new rapid rehousing projects that will serve homeless individuals, families, or youth; or Joint TH and PH-RRH component projects as defined in Section III.A.3.h of the NOFA.

It is extremely important that applicants be familiar with HUD’s CoC grant requirements, the CoC Program Interim Rule, and the Administration’s goals articulated in Opening Doors:  Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness. The NOFA and further information about the 2017 Competition can be found at www.hudexchange.info.

 

If you are interested in applying for a permanent housing project through the CoC competition, please contact Carolyn Bridges at carolynbridges@thecfr.org to obtain a Letter of Intent form. LOI’s will be due to the CoC by Friday, August 11, 2017 at 5:00pm.

OFFICERS & DIRECTORS

GA-506 Marietta/Cobb Continuum of Care

Slate of Officers and Directors

2015-2016

 

Officers

Co-Chairs
Chris Fields – MUST Ministries
Holly Tuchman – YWCA of NW Georgia

Secretary
Jeri Barr – The Center for Family Resources

Slate of Directors: Permanent Seats

  • Cobb Community Services Board                             Bryan Stephens
  • Hope Atlanta (Travelers Aid)                                     John Shereikis
  • Marietta Housing Authority                                        Jim Hartsfield
  • MUST Ministries                                                        Chris Fields
  • The Center for Family Resources                             Jeri Barr
  • The Extension                                                           Tyler Driver
  • YWCA of NW Georgia                                              Holly Tuchman        
  • Zion Keepers                                                            Veronica Sigalo
  • CDBG Office                                                             Kathleen Vaughn
  • Collaborative Applicant (ex-officio)                           Carolyn Bridges

Slate of Directors: At-Large Seats

  • Judge Reuben Green
  • Fran Sutton
  • Karen Carter
  • Erica Washington
PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Each year the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides federal resources for homeless services through its Continuum of Care (CoC) Program.   The CoC Program (24 CFR part 576) is designed to promote a community-wide commitment to the goal of ending homelessness; to provide funding for efforts by nonprofit providers, States, and local governments to quickly re-house homeless individuals, families, persons fleeing domestic violence, and youth while minimizing the trauma and dislocation caused by homelessness; to promote access to and effective utilization of mainstream programs by the homeless; and to optimize self-sufficiency among those experiencing homelessness. CoC funds may be used for projects under five program components:  Permanent Housing (including rapid rehousing and permanent supportive housing); Transitional Housing; Supportive Services Only; and HMIS.

Application for funding is made through the Continuum which completes an annual application on behalf of all the projects in the community.  The Center for Family Resources serves as the Collaborative Applicant for the GA-506 Marietta/Cobb CoC and prepares the consolidated application. HUD requires project applications submitted to the CoC for inclusion as part of the CoC Consolidated Application must be reviewed and either accepted and ranked or rejected by the CoC.

During the 2016 competition, new projects may only be created through reallocation of existing projects or through the permanent housing bonus. The CoC has not determined at this time if any projects will be reallocated in whole or part.  New projects may be created through the permanent housing bonus for permanent supportive housing projects that will serve 100% chronically homeless individuals and families and for new rapid rehousing projects that will serve homeless individuals and families coming directly from the streets or emergency shelters, and include persons fleeing domestic violence situations.

It is extremely important that applicants be familiar with HUD’s CoC grant requirements, the CoC Program Interim Rule, and the Administration’s goals articulated in Opening Doors:  Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness. The NOFA and further information about the 2016 Competition can be found at www.hudexchange.info.

If you are interested in applying for a permanent housing project through the CoC competition, please contact Carolyn Bridges at carolynbridges@thecfr.org to obtain a Letter of Intent form. LOI’s will be due to the CoC by Monday, August 1, 2016 at 5:00pm.

RATING AND RANKING PROCESS

GA-506 Marietta/Cobb CoC

Rating and Ranking Process

2016

CoC’s ARD = $2,132,318

CoC’s FPRN: $2,412,880

Ranking Requirements

The HUD CoC NOFA requires that each CoC conduct a transparent and objective process to review and rank all applications for renewal of existing projects and creation of new projects.

Tiers

To ensure that CoCs have the opportunity to prioritize their projects locally in the event that HUD is not able to fund all renewals, HUD requires that CoCs rank projects in 2 tiers.  The tiers are financial thresholds.

Tier 1 is equal to 93% of the CoC’s FY2016 Annual Renewal Demand ($2,132,318) approved by HUD on the final HUD-approved Grant Inventory Worksheet (GIW). The amount available in Tier 1 is $1,983,056. Tier 2 is the difference between Tier 1 and the CoC‘s ARD ($149,262) plus any amount available for the permanent housing bonus. CoCs may apply for up to 5% of its FPRN for the permanent housing bonus ($120,644 based on FPRN). The amount available for Tier 2 is approximately $269,906.

Creation of New Projects

CoCs may create new projects by using amounts available through the permanent housing bonus or by making funds available through reallocation. 

New projects may be created through the reallocation process for the following types of projects:

  • Permanent supportive housing projects where all beds will be dedicated for use by chronically homeless individuals and families
  • Rapid Rehousing projects that will serve homeless individuals and families coming directly from the streets or emergency shelters and include persons fleeing domestic violence situations
  • Supportive Services Only projects specifically for a centralized or coordinated assessment system
  • HMIS

New projects may be created through the permanent housing bonus for the following types of projects:

  • Permanent supportive housing projects that will serve 100% chronically homeless individuals (including unaccompanied youth) and families
  • New Rapid Rehousing projects that will serve homeless individuals (including unaccompanied youth) and families coming directly from the streets or emergency shelters or persons fleeing domestic violence situations

CoCs may apply for more than one permanent housing bonus project. (NOFA pg. 10, 11, 13, 16)

HUD Policy and Program Priorities

The FY 2016 NOFA focuses on goals articulated in Opening Doors. This includes:

  1. Create a systemic response to homelessness
    1. Measure system performance
    2. Create an effective Coordinated Entry process
    3. Promote participant choice
    4. Plan as a system
    5. Open, inclusive, and transparent delivery of homeless assistance
  2. Strategically allocate resources using cost, performance, and outcome data to improve how resources are utilized to end homelessness
    1. Comprehensively review project quality, performance, and cost effectiveness
    2. Maximize the use of mainstream and other community-based resources
    3. Review transitional housing projects for cost-effectiveness, performance, and the number and type of eligibility criteria to determine whether they should be reallocated to rapid rehousing or another model
    4. Integration in projects and activities of individuals with disabilities with individuals without disabilities
  3. End chronic homelessness
    1. Target persons with the highest needs and longest histories of homelessness for new and existing turnover units by implementing Notice CPD 14-012
    2. Increase units dedicated to individuals, youth, and families experiencing chronic homelessness
    3. Improve outreach by identifying and continually engaging all persons who are currently experiencing sheltered or unsheltered chronic homelessness or those in jeopardy of experiencing chronic homelessness
  4. End family homeless by expanding rapid rehousing programs
  5. End youth homelessness
  6. End veteran homelessness by prioritizing veterans and their families for assistance when they cannot be effectively assisted with VA services
  7. Use a Housing First Approach
    1. Use data to quickly and stably house homeless persons
    2. Engage landlords and property owners
    3. Remove barriers to entry
    4. Adopt client-centered service methods so that program participants have access to the services that they reasonably believe will help them achieve their goals but that do not require participants to participate in services

(NOFA pg. 8 -10)

HUD strongly encourages projects to lower barriers serving persons with the highest needs and vulnerabilities; the CoC’s review, ranking, and selection process must account for the higher difficulty in serving these populations. Severity of needs and vulnerabilities related to determining project review, ranking, selection, and priority include, but are not limited to:

  • Low or no income;
  • Current or past substance abuse;
  • Criminal records-with exception of restrictions imposed by federal, state or local law or ordinance;
  • Chronic homelessness in the CoC Program-funded projects;
  • Having been or currently a victim of domestic violence;
  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning (LGBTQ) status;
  • Significant health, behavioral health challenges or disability which require a significant level of support in order to maintain permanent housing;
  • High utilization of crisis or emergency services, including emergency rooms, jails, and psychiatric facilities to meet basic needs;
  • Coming from the streets or other unsheltered situations including pregnant women, infants, toddlers, and youth;
  • Vulnerability to illness or death; and
  • Vulnerability to victimization, including physical assault, human trafficking, or sex trafficking.

Strategic Resource Allocation

The FY 2016 HUD Appropriations Act requires that in order for a CoC to receive funding for a new project, other than through reallocation, the CoC must demonstrate that all project applications are evaluated and ranked based on the degree to which they improve the CoC’s system performance.  CoC Program funding must prioritize those CoCs that have demonstrated a capacity to reallocate funding from lower performing projects to higher performing projects as demonstrated through the CoC’s local selection process. (NOFA pg. 17).

HUD requires each CoC to comprehensively review all existing projects within its geographic area, using CoC-approved scoring criteria and selection priorities, to determine the extent to which each project is still necessary and addresses the listed policy priorities in the Funding Notice. Funds for projects that are determined to be underperforming, obsolete, or ineffective should be reallocated to new projects that are based on proven or promising models.

 

Marietta/Cobb CoC Policies

- Application Submission

The Marietta/Cobb CoC will invite submissions for new and renewal projects, including from members not currently funded by HUD.

The CoC will publish an open competition for Permanent Housing Bonus projects and new projects created through reallocation through the Cobb Collaborative listserv. Organizations will be required to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) outlining the proposed project and organizational information to determine that applicants have satisfactory capacity to meet HUD threshold requirements.  LOI’s will be due by close of business on August 1, 2016. Proposed projects will be rated on capacity to meet threshold requirements and other factors including:

  • Experience of the organization in utilizing federal funds and performing the activities proposed
  • Basic organization and management structure of the organization, including evidence of internal and external coordination and an adequate financial accounting system
  • Cost effectiveness of housing and services to be provided
  • Total of non-HUD resources to be used to implement the project (both match and leveraging)
  • Organization’s involvement in the Marietta/Cobb Continuum of Care
  • Organization’s level of experience in HMIS

Organizations submitting LOIs will be notified by August 3rd if they have met threshold requirements.

If no Letters of Intent are received and funds are available from reallocation, the Board of Directors will choose the new project type based on the needs of the CoC and designate an appropriate, qualified applicant.

All projects will be due in e-snaps by August 12, 2016.  The CoC will conduct a review and ranking following procedures approved by the CoC Board of Directors. A panel composed of the non-conflicted members of the CoC Board of Directors will review and make rating and ranking recommendations in accordance with HUD and Cobb guidelines.

- Project Ranking Policy

In developing our local policy governing project ranking, re-allocation, and tiers, the Marietta/Cobb CoC’s objectives are to:

  • Comply with all HUD requirements
  • Preserve funding for high performing projects
  • Shift investments from lower performing projects to new projects that help advance the goal of reducing homelessness

Projects (except HMIS) will be scored using a scoring system based on HUD-established performance measures and ranking criteria plus the CoC monitoring score.  A total of 110 points will be available with 25 points for performance criteria, 80 points for monitoring and 5 points for serving specialized populations.

  • Performance Data. Per guidance in the 2016 Detailed Instructions for the CoC application, because e-snaps was not available for CoC grants funded in FY14, APR performance data from FY13 grants will be used.  This includes bed & unit utilization and % of grant funds expended. Utilization rates based over the entire year will be included.  For family projects that use household units rather than congregate housing, unit utilization rather than bed utilization will be used.
  • Monitoring Data. The CoC will use Cobb’s monitoring data from 2014-2015 including:
    • Organizational and Program Financial Management
    • Program Operation and Performance
    • HMIS Data, Privacy and Security
    • Client Files
    • Resolution of Outstanding Findings and Concerns
  • Serving Specialized Populations
    • CoC will award 5 bonus points to each project that serves persons with the highest needs and vulnerabilities.

Projects will be ranked and placed in Tier 1 or Tier 2 according to their scores, except for projects placed in Hold Harmless status for the FY16 competition:

  • Some renewing permanent housing projects will not have an FY13 APR because they were funded in FY14 or FY15. These projects will receive 0 points for performance but will be in Hold Harmless status.
  • HMIS projects support the entire CoC and will be exempt from rating except for spending. HMIS renewals will also be in Hold Harmless status.
  • Projects in Hold Harmless status will be placed at the bottom of Tier 1 but above a project that straddles Tier 1 and Tier 2. HMIS projects will be ranked at the top of the list of Hold Harmless projects.  The ranking of the other Hold Harmless projects will be based on each agency’s monitoring score from their 2014-2015 monitoring.

New projects with a total score of less than 80 points will not be recommended to the CoC for ranking.

Renewal projects with a combined score of less than 80 points will be recommended to the CoC Board for either identification of technical assistance needed to address deficiencies, probation, recommendation of sub-grantee status, or full or partial reallocation of funds.  Review of additional documentation (e.g., ongoing monitoring reports) could be used to inform this recommendation.

The CoC will additionally require each organization to submit eLOCCS information for their FY12 through FY14 projects so that this can be a part of the FY16 reallocation conversation/strategy for the CoC. 

Project Review

The CoC will review all project applications for completeness and threshold requirements by August 19, 2016.

The Rating and Ranking Committee will meet the week of August 22, 2016 and make a recommendation for placement of projects in Tier 1 and Tier 2. The CoC will notify project applicants who submitted their project applications to the CoC by the required deadline of August 12, 2016, whether their project application(s) were accepted and ranked or rejected in writing, outside of e-snaps including the reason(s) for the rejection by August 29, 2016, 15 days before the application deadline.     

The CoC Application, Rating and Ranking Process, Priority Listing, Meeting Minutes, and Attachments will be published on the Cobb Community Collaborative Website. Community members and key stakeholders will be notified that the Application, Priority Listings, and Attachments are available for review by September 12, 2016.

 

Appeal Process

Applicants placed in Tier 1 may not appeal their rank on the Project Priority List.

Applicants may appeal any of the following decisions of the CoC:

  • Placement of project into Tier 2
  • Reduction of renewal grant amount (i.e. renewal grant partially re-allocated to a new project)
  • Elimination of renewal grant (i.e. entire grant re-allocated to a new project)

Appeals must be submitted in writing to the CoC no later than 5 days after notification of the CoC approved Rating and Ranking List.  Appeals will be heard by a panel composed of the non-conflicted members of the CoC Board plus representatives from two CoC organizations not currently serving on the Board of Directors.  The appealing organization will be notified within ten business days of the decision of the appeals panel.

2016 APPLICATION TIMELINE

GA 506 Marietta/Cobb CoC

2016 Application Timeline

CoC Board Meeting                                                                                               July 19, 2016
- Rating and Ranking Procedures Reviewed

Public Notice Published on Cobb Collaborative Website                                       July 19, 2016

LOI’s for New Projects Due                                                                                   August 1, 2016

Review of LOI’s Completed                                                                                   August 3, 2016

Project Applications Due (New and Renewal)                                                       August 12, 2016
- (must be 30 days prior to Sept. 14)

CoC Review of All Applications                                                                             August 19, 2016

Rating and Ranking Committee Meets                                                                 Week of Aug. 22

Notification of Project Approval or Rejection                                                         August 29, 2016
     - (must be 15 days prior to deadline)

CoC Application, Rating and Ranking Process, Priority Listing,                            September 12
     - Meeting Minutes, and Attachments Published on Collaborative Website
- (
must be 2 days before submission deadline)

Community Members and Key Stakeholders Notified Application                        September 12
and Priority Listings Available

CoC Submits Application                                                                                      September 13

HUD Deadline for Submission                                                                          September 14

From the beginning, CFR has been committed to collaboration and community partnership.  We are proud to have played a part in the start up of many organizations who now have their own nonprofit status. These include:

 
COBB COLLABORATIVE
COBB WORKS
COBB HUMAN SERVICES COALITION
• WINTER SHELTER
THE EXTENSION
COBB CHRISTMAS
• COBB CARE
THE EDGE CONNECTION

The Center for Family Resources is a proud community partner of the following organizations: